Welcome to the Forum

Join in-depth discussions of SFI news, products, programs, and more with your fellow SFI affiliates. Brainstorm and share tips and ideas. Start new threads. Get your questions answered 24/7, become a Forum Guru, and more!

Beware of “router hack” email scams


 Posted 7 days ago

Chris, Thank you for the head's up! If scammers worked as hard at an honest day's work as they do for dishonest gain, the world would be a better place. Thank you for keeping us in the know and we will do the same for you when we have info. to share, that's what support for fellow SFIers is all about. Johnna Ingram
Chris,
Thank you for the head's up! If scammers worked as hard at an honest day's work as they do for dishonest gain, the world would be a better place.
Thank you for keeping us in the know and we will do the same for you when we have info. to share, that's what support for fellow SFIers is all about.
Johnna Ingram
6x SUPPORT
Johnna I.

United States

E365 Champion
 
Posts: 348 | Followers: 191 | Joined SFI: Dec 18, 2017
Liked by Jasminka M.

 Posted 7 days ago

Yeah I've been getting similar emails over the past couple months. I didn't bother to open them to check the header. Most of the time, when something like this appears to be coming from me, it is actually from an IP over in Asia some place. Once there was one in Russia or near there. Yes it can be nerve-wracking to see an email claiming to have your login info and trying to ransom you for something. But just ignore it. Some of these threats came from recent database hacks at other companies, so rather than open the email, I changed passwords at companies where I knew I'd used them. But opening the email isn't a good idea. Some of these emails have malicious payloads right in the email body. If you are ever in doubt, ran an anti-virus scan. Follow that up with a Malwarebytes scan (can use the free version that installs with the pro trial features). Always be sure you have a password on your router that is not the default, and a password on your computer as well. I know I know, it slows down your computer login by all of a few seconds. But those few seconds are worth ensuring your system is safe when you are not at your computer. You can go one step further as well and create a computer/laptop/tablet user profile that doesn't have permissions to install software. Malware always uses the permission level you are logged in with. So if you are using a permission level that doesn't let you install software, then malware has a harder time installing itself as well. When you have software updates, you simply give permission to the admin user and carry on. Just ideas from my day job as a computer repair tech.
Yeah I've been getting similar emails over the past couple months. I didn't bother to open them to check the header. Most of the time, when something like this appears to be coming from me, it is actually from an IP over in Asia some place. Once there was one in Russia or near there.

Yes it can be nerve-wracking to see an email claiming to have your login info and trying to ransom you for something. But just ignore it. Some of these threats came from recent database hacks at other companies, so rather than open the email, I changed passwords at companies where I knew I'd used them.

But opening the email isn't a good idea. Some of these emails have malicious payloads right in the email body. If you are ever in doubt, ran an anti-virus scan. Follow that up with a Malwarebytes scan (can use the free version that installs with the pro trial features). Always be sure you have a password on your router that is not the default, and a password on your computer as well. I know I know, it slows down your computer login by all of a few seconds. But those few seconds are worth ensuring your system is safe when you are not at your computer. You can go one step further as well and create a computer/laptop/tablet user profile that doesn't have permissions to install software. Malware always uses the permission level you are logged in with. So if you are using a permission level that doesn't let you install software, then malware has a harder time installing itself as well. When you have software updates, you simply give permission to the admin user and carry on.

Just ideas from my day job as a computer repair tech.
7x SUPPORT
Marilynn D.

Canada

 
Posts: 304 | Followers: 163 | Joined SFI: Jun 21, 2017
Liked by Steven S.

| Edit settings